Our Services

Cardiology PC provides an extensive suite of noninvasive cardiology services, listed below, at our 3 convenient outpatient locations.

As members of the Hartford Healthcare Heart and Vascular Institute, we are also able to provide our patients with access to cutting edge technology and experts in Interventional Cardiology, Electrophysiology, Heart Failure and Transplant, Vascular, and Cardiothoracic Surgery services.

(EKG or ECG) is a test that checks for problems with the electrical activity of your heart. An EKG translates the heart’s electrical activity into line tracings on paper. The spikes and dips in the line tracings are called waves.

A type of ultrasound test that uses high-pitched sound waves sent through a device called a transducer. Very common test, used to create moving pictures of the heart to visualize function of the heart chambers, heart valves and blood vessels.

You will exercise on a treadmill, based on a specific protocol, while the cardiologist monitors your blood pressure and heart rhythm. Increasing exercise will require more oxygen to the heart and body. Heart activity is measured by a continuous electrocardiogram. The typical purpose of the test is to look for blocked heart arteries.

An exercise stress test which also incorporates an echocardiogram before and immediately after exercise. Visualizing the heart function before and after exercise provides an added layer of information regarding blood flow to the heart (ie, coronary artery disease), and also heart valve function.

Test that utilizes sequential blood pressure cuff measurements to assess for blood flow in the arteries of the legs. Abnormal tests may be followed by a dedicated ultrasound of the leg arteries at a later date.

A quick, non-invasive scan of the coronary arteries to assess for plaque build up. Also called a heart scan or a calcium score. Can be very useful to assess cardiac risk. Not performed in the office.

Non-invasive examination to evaluate blood flow through the heart arteries and also efficiency of heart’s pumping function. The “stress” portion of the test can be achieved with either exercise (treadmill) or pharmacologic (medication that replicates the effects of exercise on the heart arteries in patients unable to perform treadmill exercise).

A device worn for a short period of time (typically 24 or 48 hours) to assess electrical activity by recording every heart beat. The monitor is applied by trained office staff, and then reviewed by the cardiologist when completed.

A device worn for a longer period of time (typically 30 days), to evaluate the heart rhythm during episodic patient symptoms such as palpitations or dizziness, or to detect for asymptomatic heart rhythms such as atrial fibrillation. Device is applied by trained office staff and continually reviewed by the ordering provider.

Minimally invasive procedure, performed by our doctors at the hospital. Small monitor is inserted beneath the skin of the chest wall, with battery that can monitor for 3 years. Typical uses are heart rhythm assessment during infrequent symptoms of palpitations or passing out (syncope), or more prolonged monitoring for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation for patients with unexplained stroke.

Ultrasound tests that can comprehensively evaluate the arteries throughout the body, typically focusing on the neck (carotid arteries), abdomen (for AAA – abdominal aortic aneurysm) or legs (peripheral arterial disease).

(EKG or ECG) is a test that checks for problems with the electrical activity of your heart. An EKG translates the heart’s electrical activity into line tracings on paper. The spikes and dips in the line tracings are called waves.

A type of ultrasound test that uses high-pitched sound waves sent through a device called a transducer. Very common test, used to create moving pictures of the heart to visualize function of the heart chambers, heart valves and blood vessels.

You will exercise on a treadmill, based on a specific protocol, while the cardiologist monitors your blood pressure and heart rhythm. Increasing exercise will require more oxygen to the heart and body. Heart activity is measured by a continuous electrocardiogram. The typical purpose of the test is to look for blocked heart arteries.

An exercise stress test which also incorporates an echocardiogram before and immediately after exercise. Visualizing the heart function before and after exercise provides an added layer of information regarding blood flow to the heart (ie, coronary artery disease), and also heart valve function.

Test that utilizes sequential blood pressure cuff measurements to assess for blood flow in the arteries of the legs. Abnormal tests may be followed by a dedicated ultrasound of the leg arteries at a later date.

A quick, non-invasive scan of the coronary arteries to assess for plaque build up. Also called a heart scan or a calcium score. Can be very useful to assess cardiac risk. Not performed in the office.

Non-invasive examination to evaluate blood flow through the heart arteries and also efficiency of heart’s pumping function. The “stress” portion of the test can be achieved with either exercise (treadmill) or pharmacologic (medication that replicates the effects of exercise on the heart arteries in patients unable to perform treadmill exercise).

A device worn for a short period of time (typically 24 or 48 hours) to assess electrical activity by recording every heart beat. The monitor is applied by trained office staff, and then reviewed by the cardiologist when completed.

A device worn for a longer period of time (typically 30 days), to evaluate the heart rhythm during episodic patient symptoms such as palpitations or dizziness, or to detect for asymptomatic heart rhythms such as atrial fibrillation. Device is applied by trained office staff and continually reviewed by the ordering provider.

Minimally invasive procedure, performed by our doctors at the hospital. Small monitor is inserted beneath the skin of the chest wall, with battery that can monitor for 3 years. Typical uses are heart rhythm assessment during infrequent symptoms of palpitations or passing out (syncope), or more prolonged monitoring for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation for patients with unexplained stroke.

Ultrasound tests that can comprehensively evaluate the arteries throughout the body, typically focusing on the neck (carotid arteries), abdomen (for AAA – abdominal aortic aneurysm) or legs (peripheral arterial disease).

Meet our Techs

Felipe Segura,
RDCS

Felipe Segura

Michele Masse, CNMT

Michele Masse

Tracy O’Connor-Maser, RDCS

Tracy O'Connor-Maser, RDCS

Wendy Lapierre, RDCS

Wendy Lapierre, RDCS